Get our e-newsletter

Notes from the publisher: Let the Sun shine

23

Rozzo’s grandmother Sunny in her garden

 

April is full of shower bursts and dazzling sunlight. The earth seems greener. Flowers are blooming from the sapphire blue phlox to the gold forsythia. Spring has sprung and summer is just around the  corner.

Ahhh, summer . . . school will be out and how will your children pass the lazy, hazy days of summer? This April issue features our 15th Annual Day Camp Guide (see pages 14- 31). We have put together a list of day camps offered right here in East Cobb County and/or a short drive away. While day camp can help your children learn a better backhand in tennis, acquire a stronger stroke in swimming, or get in touch with nature, the true payoff of camp will be apparent when your child becomes a bit more self-reliant, self-sufficient and self-confident.

Spring is also a great time to get in touch with nature. In fact, April is Earth Month, and Earth Day is April 22. So this edition includes an article on the traveling Vanishing Tree exhibit (see page 6) and on page 57, Murdock Elementary students sent in their tips on how we can be better stewards of the earth. Out of the mouths of babes…

I’d like to dedicate this issue to my grandmother, Mary Hoyes (1912-1992), I could not help thinking about her as I was putting the information on day camps and the “green” articles together. As a camp director from 1970 to 1980, “Sunny” (her camp name) loved the outdoors and inspired the Girl Scout campers in her care to experience a sense of community and value nature. As a camp professional and as my grandmother, she taught me some valuable life lessons with her “sunny” disposition and her appreciation of what was real, genuine, and nonartificial in people as well as in the world. So, here’s to you, Grandma – who demonstrated how to age “actively” (she was 58 when she became a camp director!) and taught me to connect with nature and good people.

To my readers, I hope the information in this edition helps you connect with nature and good people, too! Happy Spring!

May you bloom and grow,

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder l Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

Reprinted from the April 2015 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the April issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.

March Publisher’s Note: Bloom and Grow

23

Turn on the news lately? From the Ukrainian ceasefire, to ISIS terrorism to local fires and murder, it  makes me realize there will be times in our lives that we will be faced with unexpected, beyond-our- control situations and stories which force us to realize what is most important. At times like these, I cope by focusing on the people in my life and the little, everyday things that really make life special and worthwhile. I hope you will find in this issue of the EAST COBBER magazine, stories which help you  focus on the special connections in our community and inspire you in your personal life.

This month’s annual Home & Garden special section provides some local resources and inspiration to make your house a home. This edition also features two East Cobb parents’ positive responses to their tragic situations (see pages 7 & 11) to the churches offering Easter egg hunts (see page 48) as well as the Golden “K” Kiwanis Clubs’ effort to raise money for our community (see page 9 ) — they all embody the adage, “bloom where you’re planted.”

We may not have the perfect circumstances –career, home or relationship. Few of us do. But if we have the gift of today, we have a chance to re-create our circumstances and make them as perfect as possible with the resources we have. As the English playwright George Bernard Shaw, observed, “The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want… And if they can’t find them, make them.” These fellow East Cobbers and all those featured in this issue (including our advertisers, most are small business owners) have truly bloomed where they have been planted. Their attitude, like so many East Cobbers, makes our East Cobb community a better place.

May you bloom and grow,

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder l Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

Reprinted from the March 2015 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the March issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.

February Publisher’s Note: Work from the heart

cynthia headshot1-240x294

Work is love made visible.
-KAHLIL GIBRAN
Most of us do not consider our work in a romantic way. But I believe work as a parent, a teacher, volunteer or whatever vocation we pursue allows us to show our love for others by contributing our talents for a greater good. The poet Kahlil Gibran observed, “When you work, you fulfill a part of earth’s fondest dream assigned to you when that dream is born.” This edition of the EAST COBBER spotlights those people in our East Cobb community fulfilling their part of the “earth’s fondest dream” by working from the heart.

From Lucia McBeth starting a nonprofit and becoming a political activist (see page 10) to the members of the Big Chicken Chorus singing Valentine’s Day wishes (see page 7) to the organizers of the Amazing Grace Race (see page 54)—all are examples of East Cobbers showing their love through their work.

This edition also marks the 17th anniversary of the special section, “Child Care and Preschool Guide.”  Born out of my own need for quality child care for my then preschool-aged children, I realized that other parents may be in search of those services. After hours of research and revisions, I am proud to present not only the plethora of child care and preschools offered right here in our own backyard, but also the high caliber of child care facilities that play a vital role in the healthy development of our children. The information on pages 20-27 fulfills the EAST COBBER’s mission to provide, you, the reader, with useful information about our community.

It is my hope that this issue, like every issue, is a handy reference for East Cobb residents in search of local resources as well as a source of inspiration.

Working from the heart,

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder l Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

Reprinted from the February 2015 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the February issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.

January Publisher’s Note: Doing Good in 2015

22

On December 31st many people make a list of things they are going to do to improve their lives. We say we are going to eat less and work out more. We are going to read every book reviewed by the New York Times. By the time you are reading this, all of your New Year’s resolutions are most likely down the proverbial tubes.

While you can’t go back to December 31st and redo your resolutions, you can begin now to think about making resolutions that will not only help you, but help your community. How about resolving to volunteer at MUST Ministries? Maybe if you see people who appreciate being fed on a regular basis you may think twice before you eat a whole box of chocolates. How about spending your time laying sod, hammering nails, and painting trim for Habitat for Humanity? Take a look at our list of local non-profits highlighted in our annual “Do Good Guide” on pages 10-19 for ideas on how you can help those in need.

Why should you spend your New Year’s resolutions doing things that would help someone other than yourself? I believe we are responsible for the state of the community we live in and don’t really have a right to complain and wait for “others” to do our civic responsibility. If people waited for someone else to stand up, speak out, and initiate social change, we would be living in the dark ages. We would still be under British rule, slavery would be the norm, and women wouldn’t be able to show their ankles. Since others have created opportunities for us, it is only fair for us to return the favor and continue the cycle of positive community change. Speaking of civic responsibility, make a New Year’s resolution to spend more time updating yourself on who your Georgia state representative is (page 44) and letting them know what you think about bills they have to vote on. Page 38 features the zonings and variances that the East Cobb Civic association keeps an
eye on for our benefit. Clubs and support groups (see pages 60 & 61 and 64) are also a great way to help others and serve our community, take a look at our monthly list to see how you can help or be helped.

You still have time to turn your year around and resolve to do some things that really matter. The year is still young so don’t waste your time lamenting over your broken resolutions. Pick up the EAST COBBER every month and read about your neighbors that are contributing to the quality of life in East Cobb. Hopefully, you’ll be inspired to get involved, too. Who knows, with all of your new activities, you may not have time to worry about your weight.

 

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder l Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

P.S. Need exercise? Check out our Health & Wellness section (pages 46-55) for local experts ready, willing and able to help
you achieve a new year’s resolution.

Reprinted from the January 2015 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the January issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.

 

Publisher’s Note: Celebrating miracles

cynthia headshot1-240x294

December is a month to celebrate miracles—Hanukah and Christmas. Though this holiday season is one of the most magical times of the year, many of us often find the season to be stressful. I  hope by reading this issue of the EAST COBBER you are giving yourself a break from the holiday rush. You can get some gift-giving ideas on pages 20-23 in our annual gift guide. The merchants featured are in our own backyard so that should make your shopping a little easier. Please check them out, you’ll be inspired by the gift selections they offer and you’ll be supporting our local economy. I am proud of the Holiday Happenings (see  pages 24- 31) we have compiled to help you make special memories this season. When the going gets really tough, another  stressbuster is eating out. The dining directory on pages 40-43 should give you a short list of local restaurants that you can enjoy with friends or family!

As always, this issue includes stories about East Cobbers that share their “gifts” to make life better for others. From East Cobb Citizens of the Year, Mary and Ed Ettel putting care packages together for our troops to our local PTAs promoting family engagement (see page 12) to the Big Chicken Chorus making the season a bit brighter with their popular Christmas show performances. I hope you, EAST COBBER reader, are inspired by their “gift”-giving and may be encouraged to share your gift to create a better East Cobb. And if you are already helping or bringing happiness to someone in need, let me share your story!
Just give me call or e-mail the EAST COBBER.

For me, the best presents I’ll receive this holiday season can’t be wrapped–my three healthy children. Another favorite present is the joy of being able to work on this paper every month for such a great community. It’s a gift I’m thankful for not just during the holidays but everyday.

From my family to yours: Happy Holidays!

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder l Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

Reprinted from the December 2014 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the December issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.

November Publisher’s Note: Giving Thanks

23

Cynthia with her cavachon, Rebel

Each year, Thanksgiving allows me to create and continue the legacy of love and tradition for my family. I cherish the feeling of contentment, knowing I have so much to be thankful for. So, readers, gather at the EAST COBBER Thanksgiving “table”, read this  November issue, and rejoice in East Cobb’s bounty of blessings.

The EAST COBBER gives thanks by publishing stories about people doing good in our community, like MUST Ministries and their annual Gobble Jog (see page 6). This issue carries on that “Thanksgiving” spirit represented in our stories—from our local PTA’s push for “No Place To Hate” program (see page 8), to spotlighting East Cobb police precinct 4’s Officers of the Year (see page 16 & 17).

Pets are close companions because they provide love, comfort, safety, warmth, happiness, and friendship as well as teach us some great life lessons. This issue proudly features our 8th annual “Pet Guide” for pet owners and animal lovers. This special  section is a handy resource for everything and anything pet-related in the East Cobb area. You’ll find emergency numbers, clubs and codes, adoption options, and more. Be sure to enjoy the photographs of our readers’ beloved pets. We receive so many pet photos and we still didn’t have enough pages to show them off.

“Thanksgiving” is gratitude in action as well as thoughtful reflection. So, thanks to all of you readers, who are the heart and soul of this publication, the reason for this magazine’s existence. I have so much to be thankful for, and I don’t mean to trivialize  those personal treasures of family and friends or living in this great country, but the relationship between EAST COBBER and you, the reader, is one that forms the basis of all that I think about when I am creating each issue.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank our many advertisers who choose to promote their businesses by placing ads in the EAST COBBER. Without their commitment there would be no publication. And thanks to our 500 community-minded  merchants who act as drop-off points for EAST COBBER. I Appreciate You All!

Happy Thanksgiving!

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder l Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

Reprinted from the November 2014 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the November issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.

October Publisher’s Note: 21 years of EAST COBBER!

Cynthia Rozzo, September 2014 headshot

This October edition marks the 21st anniversary of the EAST COBBER magazine. 244 monthly issues, 19 community parades, a website, a Facebook page, twitter feed, 3 children, and the same husband later, I am still focused on informing local residents about our good neighbors, special events and local issues in East Cobb County. Since 1993, the EAST COBBER has been  publishing articles about East Cobb volunteers, artists and advertisers, clubs and community leaders, musicians and moms. The
EAST COBBER front cover will continue to feature those people in East Cobb County making this area an even better place to live.

The EAST COBBER has also become well-known for its special sections. This issue features our ninth annual Private School Guide, as well as our monthly Seniors section, Dining Guide and Health & Wellness section. It has always been my intention to provide useful and relevant information that you can’t find anywhere else and that focuses exclusively on East Cobb.

I hope you enjoy reading the EAST COBBER as much as I enjoy putting each edition together month after month. After so many years of meeting readers and business owners, I am reminded everyday of how many really nice people there are in this  community. East Cobb has so many residents who take the initiative to help out, to share their opinions and/or talents, in order to make East Cobb County a better place to live. The annual EAST COBBER Parade & Festival is another example of neighbors coming together to celebrate our great community, and for me, as the producer/director of the parade, I am able to witness first
hand the genuine kindness, generosity, and cooperation East Cobbers demonstrate to make the this special event such a rousing success. See pages 6-9 for some photos taken that day.

I may put the magazine out, but it belongs to the East Cobb community. Special credit goes to the East Cobbers that reach out to
me to discuss story ideas, submit articles, and to advertise. Of course, I am grateful to those who just pick up the paper at one of our 500+ drop-off points every month and actually read the paper! In a world of conglomerates and sensational journalism, your kind comments and constructive criticisms inspire me to continue my work as publisher of a truly grass-roots publication. As always, feel free to contact me with your ideas, comments and critiques.

 

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder l Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

Reprinted from the October 2014 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the October issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.

September Publisher’s Letter: Honoring East Cobb Police

Cynthia Rozzo, September 2014 headshot

What a coincidence selecting a police officer to be on this month’s front cover. I wanted to honor a public safety officer to commemorate the 13th anniversary of 9/11 and chose Capt. Jerry Quan because: 1) he is head of Precinct 4-East Cobb’s police force; and 2) he has provided security (from 11pm to 7am) at the EAST COBBER Festival site for the past 10 years.

Then as we were preparing this issue, the shooting of an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, set off nearly two weeks of protests and backlash against police in that St. Louis suburb, but it also had citizens evaluating police and community relations not only in Kansas City but also the rest of the country. So, the front cover photo of Captain Jerry Quan takes on a deeper significance of what, I think, is right with our local police. By going beyond his official job as East Cobb’s precinct commander, Capt. Quan, an East Cobb resident, is often seen out and about in our community (like directing traffic at a school or grabbing a coffee with an East Cobber) which allows him to understand the nuances of our East Cobb neighborhoods while also fighting crime.

With the lowest crime rate in Cobb County, we East Cobbers often overlook the role law enforcement officers have in making that happen. We are lucky to have Capt. Quan who goes beyond arrests and citations and, because he genuinely likes to help people, affects the livability of East Cobb in a positive way.

The 19th annual EAST COBBER Parade & Festival, to be held on September 13, is another way the EAST COBBER showcases all that is good here in East Cobb County. This hometown tradition has been, for the past 19 years, a great opportunity for East Cobb residents to come together and share their pride and have some good old-fashioned fun.

Our Parade & Festival special section (pages 12 to 21) reviews all the different groups marching, entertaining, and feeding us that day! Hope to see you, there!

 

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder|Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

Reprinted from the September 2014 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the September issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.

August Publisher’s Note: Education is key

Cynthia fall

We cannot have a sense of community without having a sense of shared values. One of those values we share in East Cobb is a belief in quality education. After all, isn’t that why most people move to this side of Cobb County?

The reputation of East Cobb’s public schools’ top test scores and quality learning environments draws people to East Cobb. Even if you  don’t have a child in school we all have a stake in our community’s educational system—from our property values to future leaders to future employees. On pages 6 -18, we pulled together those education stats, school by (East Cobb) school- which provides evidence for East Cobb’s great reputation for its schools. While the test scores offer a quick take that helps parents and teachers measure a school’s success, it is important to note that beyond the rankings, each school needs to be assessed for other qualities, such as: strong school leadership, parental and community support, creating an environment where students can learn and grow, access to up-to-date textbooks and technology.

I have three children attending schools in East Cobb: Lee will be a senior at Walton High School; Nikos will be a sophomore; and, Eleni will be an eighth-grader at Dickerson Middle School-so I have a personal interest in the information presented in our Back to School Guide! I hope the test scores and stats help you gain some insight on your neighborhood school(s) and our East Cobb community. In the meantime, I, like so many other East Cobb parents, will be in the trenches collecting on the ground intelligence by attending PTA meetings, volunteering at my child’s school, and/or bumping into other moms to help me make sure my son or daughter is in a place where they experience the excitement — and the relevance — of learning, and where the next generation of intelligent, hard-working, disciplined leaders is being nourished.

Speaking of nourished: everyone needs to eat, so why not enjoy a local restaurant as an opportunity to sit down, slow down and enjoy life?

When deciding to dine out, I hope you’ll refer to our 17th Annual Dining Guide (pages 36-51) for inspiration. So, eat, drink, and be merry—right here in East Cobb!

 

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder l Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

Reprinted from the August 2014 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the August issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.

Publisher’s Note: Celebrating Dad

Cynthia Rozzo

As the saying goes “Behind every great man there is a great woman,” the inspiration behind the celebration of a Father’s Day is due in part to Mother’s Day. After hearing sermons on the significance of setting aside a day for mothers, Mrs. John B. Dodd, of Spokane, Washington, first proposed the idea of a “Father’s Day” in 1909. Mrs.
Dodd wanted a special day to honor her father, William Smart. William Smart, a Civil War veteran, was widowed when his wife (Mrs. Dodd’s mother) died in childbirth with their sixth child. Mr. Smart was left to raise the newborn and his other five children by himself on a farm in Washington state. It was after Mrs. Dodd became an adult that she realized the strength and selflessness her father had shown in raising his children as a single parent. The first Father’s Day was
observed on June 19, 1910 in Spokane, Washington. Father’s Day has become a day to not only honor your father, but all men who act as a father figure. Stepfathers, uncles, grandfathers, and adult male friends are all honored on Father’s Day.

In that same spirit the EAST COBBER continues its Father of the Year essay contest. It’s fun to read all the great
tributes written about East Cobb dads. The winning essay written by Erin Davenport, about her father, Stephen, can be read on page 6.

In this world of hype and celebrity, many young (and older,too!) men and women are looking for a role model. Our popular culture promotes great athletes, movie stars and/or popular rock stars as people to admire. The EAST COBBER magazine focuses on the role models within reach and that we can truly be inspired by. Moms and dads are
the most obvious heroes for us to emulate. This publication is happy to grant them a few minutes of fame. Hence, the annual Father of the Year contest. EAST COBBER also features stories of other East Cobb residents that contribute to our quality of life. The people featured in this edition—from the parishioners at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church (see page 14) to the East Cobb high school valedictorians spotlighted on page 18—are excellent examples of role models right here in our own backyards, within our reach. There’s a lot of good we can learn from our parents, friends, and fellow East Cobbers.

I hope after reading this edition, like every edition, you will not only learn a little bit more about what is going on in
our community but also be inspired by the people that make East Cobb such a great place to live!

 

 

cynthia

Cynthia M. Rozzo
Founder l Publisher
cynthia@eastcobber.com

Reprinted from the June/July 2014 issue of EAST COBBER. Read the June/July issue HERE.

Founder and president of EAST COBBER, Cynthia Rozzo, created the free monthly publication, EAST COBBER, in 1993 to serve East Cobb County residents by providing a forum for them to share their ideas and a source for them to learn more about their community. Ms. Rozzo is also the proud producer of the annual EAST COBBER Community Parade and Festival. An East Cobb County resident since 1991, Rozzo lives in the Park Ridge subdivision with her husband, George Haralabidis, and three children, Lee, Nikos and Eleni.